What We Read in June 2016

20160612_233816159_iOSLately I have been spending a lot of time on Pinterest looking for book ideas for my preschooler. When find a good list, I take it and use it to order books from our local library. I have also been reading through the books in our personal library with Little Z as well. I thought that I would start to share what we read each month, in case any of my readers are looking for some book ideas.

Little Z’s attention span towards books is getting longer and longer. This is allowing us to hit up many books that in the past were to long for him. This is super exciting for me, as it allows me to expose him to new vocabulary.

So this is what my 4 year old and I read in June 2016

  1.  I Love You Always and Forever
  2.  Grandfather Twilight
  3.  Light Up the Night
  4.  Max and Ruby: Super Max Saves the World
  5.  My Grandpa Is Great
  6.  This Little Pirate
  7.  World of Reading: Jake and the Never Land Pirates Pirate Campout: Level 1
  8.  My Ponies (Hello Reader!)
  9. Your Baby Can Read Book 1
  10. Roadwork! (Disney/Pixar Cars) (Step into Reading)
  11.  Thomas and the School Trip (I Can Read It All By Myself Beginner Books)
  12.  The Berenstain Bears Catch the Bus: A Tell the Time Story (Step into Reading, Step 2)
  13.  When We Go Camping
  14.  Night Lights
  15. Superman Classic: Superman versus the Silver Banshee (I Can Read Level 2)
  16. Olivia Helps Mother Nature (Ready-to-Read Level One)
  17. Puss in Boots- I Can Read- Level 1
  18. Parts (Picture Puffin Books)
  19. I Can Do It! (Step into Reading)
  20. The Chick That Wouldn’t Hatch
  21. Dinosaur Ed (Reader’s Digest) (All-Star Readers)
  22. Olivia Helps Mother Nature (Ready-to-Read Level One)
  23. Blackout
  24. Curious George Cleans Up (CGTV Reader)
  25. Super Spies (Disney/Pixar Cars 2) (Step into Reading)
  26. Pumpkins (Science Sight Word Readers)
  27. Milk and Cookies
  28. 1, 2, 3, Bunny (Focus on Family)
  29. Old Mother Hubbard
  30. Good Night Bear! (Troll First-Start Science)
  31. Down The Drain – Finding Nemo Phonics Set
  32. Beauty and the Beast – Level 1 – I Can Read
  33. First On The Moon
  34. I Have to Go (Sesame Street Toddler Books)
  35. Planet Earth: Baby Penguins
  36. A Very Busy Firehouse (Community Helpers)
  37. Halloween Countdown
  38. Thank You Prayer
  39. Just Like Dad (Little Golden Book)
  40. Grover’s Adventure Under the Sea (Peek-a-Board Books)

Now this might not look like many books, however we also have been reading stories out of the book Random House Book of Easy-to-Read Stories. As well as a story from My Good Night Devotions (Bean Sprouts) each night.

Check out a past What We Read post:

What My 2 Year Old(32 months) And I Read This Month January 2015

What books have you and your little ones read recently?

Early Learning Mom Top 10 Blog Post Of 2015

Wow! How is it already the end of 2015. I feel like I was just writing my 2014 10 Top Blog Post a few months ago. In reality, it has been 12 months!!

Reflecting back to 2015, I want to take the time to thank all my readers for continuing to come around and read about my adventures with Little Z and Wes. I know I’m not always consistent with my updates, but I am so grateful for your patiences.

Here are this years Top 5 Post!

Light-Blue-Sky-with-Flat-Bells

#5 Preschool Prodigies eBook And Bells Review : This was such an awesome experience for Z and I. We had the chance to review Mr Rob’s music program. Little Z and I received a set of musical desk bells and since then we have been learning music and having fun!

pail-bucket-md

#4 New Years Goals/Bucket List : Well in my 2016 Bucket List Post, I confess that I did not do very well on this list in 2015. I managed to complete 8/52 challenges. However I have learned from my mistakes, and I have not given up. This year I have created a binder, which includes the list printed out, as well as charts to help me stay on track. 2016 is a whole new year and I plan on nailing it this year.

2014-10-21-2B19.13.38

#3 Toddler Tula Vs Ergo Carrier. My Experience with My Favorite Baby Carriers. : This post is actually a late 2014 post, but it still made the 2015 list due to popularity. I love babywearing! Babywearing kept me sane for the first 3 years of Little Z’s life. It’s how I was able to run my daycare, host birthday parties, and get through the newborn/infant/toddler stage. Sadly this year Z has decided he no long wants to be worn. So that is a stage in our life that is over now. While I did sell the ergo, I have both the Cuddly Wrap and the Tula, no babies are planned in the near future, however I’m not ready to give them up.

NACD Logo-Letters Only

#2 NACD With My Nine Year Old. Helping Your Child with Reading Comprehension. I wanted to cry the day my oldest said he “Hates reading.” As an avid reader, I could not comprehend how someone could actually hate to read. However, if you are not not understanding what you are reading, of course it is not going to be enjoyable. Currently we are on vacation from the NACD due to the awful Canadian dollar, however we still incorporate some of their programs into our day.

And my number 1 post of 2015 is:

TSI and TLP

#1 NACD Early Learning at 32 Months Old : This post received over two times the amount of views my #2 post received. I found the NACD really got me on the path to teaching my son in ways I had never thought of. While we are on vacation, I am still using a lot of strategies they have provided me. Rereading this post reminds me of a few others that I should be still working on. I am so excited to be able to get back on board with them again.

 

Book Review: He’s Not Autistic, But… by Tenna Merchent

Hes not autisticHe’s Not Autistic But…: How We Pulled Our Son From the Mouth of the Abyss

I love reading autobiographies mom’s have written about raising a child with autism, and succeeding. Even though these books are not designed as a step by step guide, a lot of these books have forced me to step back and consider new options.

Tenna’s son Clay was a very sick little boy. But that actually was not that surprising, seeing as she herself was also very ill. One thing I find fascinating that you see in this book, a mother herself can be very sick, however its not until her child falls ill that she is going to stop at nothing to help her child.

I can relate a lot with Tenna’s story. The heartbreak when the doctors you have trusted cannot help your child. If you were like me, you were raise believing doctors have all the answers when it comes to your health. Get your shots and don’t ask any questions. Take your pills, the doctors know best.

What happens when there are no answers, or when your doctor doesn’t think there is a problem? But you know in your heart there is.

Clay was not developing as he should have been, and while his doctor said he is not autistic, he was considered high risk to be autism. Hence the title of their book “He’s Not Autistic, But…”.

Between dealing with headbanging, allergies, yeast, chronic illness, and aluminum poor Clay was dealing with a lot.

One thing I really liked about this book is the chapter on Tenna’s infertility and difficulties during pregnancy(preeclampsia). While I did not suffer from infertility, I did suffer from preeclampsia. This puts a new perspective on the situation. As important for us to figure out how to help our kids with Autism, its equally important to figure out whats going on with our babies prenatally and try and prevent autism before birth. Interestingly enough there are now some studies suggesting that moms of children with autism were more than 2 times likely to have has suffered from preeclampsia. (Read Here)

The author, take the reader through step by step of what she did. What therapies she tried, her theories and what worked and what did not work for Clay. I think as a reader this insight is just pure gold. I know that it opened my eyes to different possibilities and because of her suggestions I explored other avenues with my boys. Its also worth noting, if you do read this book and read about one of the therapies that may not have yield the best results for Clay, but you feel strongly about it, still look into it. Some therapies work for one child and not another.