*Video Fixed*Homemade Glenn Doman Inspired Books and Flashcards

I know it’s been awhile since my last post. I do apologize. I have been active on Instagram and Youtube. I’ve had a reader or two request I not completely switch over to Vlogging. I’ve been dying to get on here and blog, but since Little Z has decided he’s too cool for naps it’s been hard. Hopefully once Little Z is in full day ABA I will be able to really get back to blogging. For now I hope the sporadic post, and the more regular instagram and Youtube post will be acceptable.

In the past I have talked about our Learning Binders. But I do have to say in the last month or so we have really picked it up with these binders. Z is really responsive to Glenn Doman style learning. I also realized if I’m going to get him to take that next step to reading books on his own, I have to create more homemade books for him to read. So that’s what I’ve been doing. If you’d like to see what they look like, watch the video above. I show you what I have in the binders and what my homemade books look like.

One thing I did not mention in the video is font size. The few that I made from scratch I now realized I have to adjust the print size and reprint. I just notice the larger print keeps his attention much longer. SO even at 3.5 years old, large print is still important.

So to break this down a bit more we have:

1) Learning Binders to present Encyclopedic Knowledge, poems and work on couplets, sentences and skip counting.

2) Story Duotangs to present homemade books. I was able to speak to the IAHP via Facebook messenger. What we are doing after confirming with them is presenting one books a day, reading it 2-3 times, and retiring it to an place where Z can retrieve it himself and read when he wants. I’m sure once the books become longer, we might be reading them less times in a day, but for now this seems to be working. The rep from IAHP also told me if he seems to be bored with a certain book, retire it sooner.

3) I’m currently creating 100s of word flashcards. I’m going to create a binder that breaks down words based on different topics, and another binder with the current words we are working on. We will flip through this binder to introduce new vocabulary. I was hoping to start today, but I did not want to start till we have at least 200 flash cards ready to go. My printer died at 76 last night. I will make a video showing this in more detail when it’s ready. However I think this method, binder style, will help keep all the flashcards organized and simple post its  on each divider will allow me to know when to retire words.

So the learning binders will be less strict. I’m not interested in running a traditional Glenn Doman Encyclopedic Knowledge program. But when it comes to reading, since Z is responding well, I want to encourage it.

One thing I think is worth mentioning is this. If your child is not labeling items during the day, and by this I mean is not pointing out and labeling dogs, squirrels, bulldozers, naming items like forks, or describing actions etc. You might want to included pictures with your words. While Glenn Doman does not worry about comprehension, other programs like the NACD do. Z is able to label 1000s of items, but with my oldest this was not the case. At the end of the day, he can read and decode at a high level but sometimes still struggles with comprehension. I also believe not introducing Doman Style books to him affected things as well with my oldest.

If you’re trying to figure out how you can afford to print out all these flashcards and books check out my friend Liz’s(otherwise know as DomanMom) post. She was able to help me pick an awesome printer. While the ink cartridges from Amazon have caused me nothing but trouble, I have been able to purchase some from the local ink shop for a lot cheaper than my old HP, and they allow me to print out so many more pages for that cheaper price.

What Is Early Learning To Me?

This is a topic that everyone seems to have a different option.

What is Early Learning?

All kids start learning at a very early age. Even before they are born, fetuses are learning the sound of their mother’s voice. Infants start learning their native tongue. Toddlers learn how to walk, talk, etc.

Well yes all that is learning, I don’t consider that “Early Learning” though.

To me Early Learning is a parent creating an environment for a child to learn something that is not typically taught at that age.

While no one will bat an eyelash at the thought of teaching a little one there ABCs or to count to 10. As soon as your start teaching your little one letter sounds, sight words, days of the week, addition, etc, you MUST be pressuring them.

Early Learning is not hot housing little babies. Its not strapping them down and drilling math problems. Those types of techniques would not work on a baby or a toddler.

But when you present information to a child in a fun, gentle, calm way, your child will WANT to learn. When I do flashcards with my child or for us we use Learning Binders Little Z gets so excited. While we were with the NACD, they did not want us doing this program, so I put the binders away. Well one day I found that he broke into my room and found them in the closet and was using them himself. So trust me this is a gentle process.

What does Early Learning Look Like?

Early Learning when it comes to reading might be a mom sitting down with her child at 6 months following the flashcard program designed in Glenn Doman’s How to Teach your Baby to Read book.

Wesley GraduationTo another family Early Learning Reading might look like it did for Wes and I when he was two. In the morning I would play Your Baby Can Read(YBCR) DVDs while he ate his breakfast. Then I would buckle him in the car to go to daycare and flash through a few index cards with words handwritten on them. We would arrive at daycare and we would go through them again. He would get dropped off at daycare and I would go to work. In the evening he would watch another video of YBCR. Then after supper and playtime, it would be bath and bed. We would read a book or two together, flash though some flashcards and off to bed he went. When he was three we finished the YBCR DVDs and started using BrillKids Little Reader(2 sessions) before bed.

SAM_0965To another family Early Learning Reading might look like what happened with Z. He was a second child to an Early Learning family. We started some of Glenn Doman’s “How Smart is Your Baby program early on. We also started him on Sparkabilities DVD’s at a week old. Then when he was 3 months old we started  BK Little Reader. It took me a little longer then I would have liked to start him on the other BrillKids programs because my laptop broke and took me a few months to replace, But during that time I was so grateful to have the iPad. When he was 12 months we started doing apps like Hooked On Phonics and Teach Me among others.

I think that the environment is the key. I think at the end of the day to be considered an Early Learning parent, your child must be in the early learning window of 0-5 years old. These parents go beyond the usual ABC’s and 123’s.

What is Early Learning to your family?

Thrift Store Find – Hooked On Phonics SRA Reading Power

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I can’t be the only one who does this? I’ll be at the local thrift store and I will see something totally cool, for next to nothing, and buy it. Even though it is not age appropriate for my child. I mean you will eventually us it right? Then usually you forget about it and find it once your child has outgrown it.

Well for once I found something I bought a few years ago BEFORE Wes has grown out of it. Actually we will get a LOT of use out of it.

IMG_3574Hooked on Phonics: Your Reading Power (Adapted for Home and Personal Use from the SRA Reading Laboratory Series) : Which is a book full of stories that are designed to be read by the child and then there are questions that the child has to answer.

These are basic on the SRA lab method that is used in many schools. Thinking back, I remember using something similar in elementary myself.

For now Wesley and I are working on two leaflets a day. But right now its fairly easy for him. Once it starts to become a little more challenging we will slow down to one story a day.

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As you can see it does become more difficult. SO I can see this being a program we work on long term. I doubt by the end of the summer that we will be finishing this program, but I can really seeing us making a good dent in it.

Have you ever found any Thrift Store deal that you couldn’t turn down that your child was still not ready for?

What are we doing now? Early Educations and Afterschooling

20150524_145741684_iOSWell now that we are no longer working with the NACD, I decided that I need to reevaluate what we are doing education wise with Wes and Little Z.


 

20150523_013745730_iOSLast night was Wes’s last piano practice till the fall. Last year I just put him in at a music school 10 mins away every other week to keep him fresh. But this year that school is shutting down for the month of July and opening for August. While we can do sessions in August, it does not make sense since we are on holidays 2 of the weeks. So I guess my mission for the next few weeks is to find a summer music teacher.

As of today our main focus has been the Simply Smarter online computer programs and khan academy. We’ve also been doing a few of the Kumon books on Multiplication. While know that they are gaged at 6,7 and 8 years old, I think that Wes needs to work on hammering down his math facts. Honestly I have been pretty bad at working with him on shared high interest reading and comprehension reading. I really know I need to step it up a little in this area.

I know that come summer things are going to change. Wes does not do well with unscheduled time. I know if I don’t plan for things I will have him bugging me with the usual, “I’m bored Mom!” line. So while I want him to have fun just being a kids, I think I need to plan. So stay tuned for summer ideas for school agers.


20150523_014557161_iOSWith Little Z we have been trying to enjoy as much outside time as possible. Come September we will be starting with the ABA program with him, and will likely have less free time.

But at the same time I want to stay on top of his education as well. So we reintroduced the The EEECF Country Course vol. 1 using the Little Reader program.

I have also been using Little Reader to create books to use along side out Hooked On Phonics app and workbooks.

 We have also been watching Rachel Coleman’s new Preschool series : Rachel and the Treeschoolers.

I bought this series during their kickstarter campaign a while back. Little Z and my daycare kids just love them so much. Its crazy to watch your little ones singing songs about photosynthesis.

On top of all this we are still using a number of apps, and reading as much as we can with a squirmy little boy. We are also working on some make shift ABA programs. Puzzles, matching Etc.

I think come September once we have a good ABA schedule in place, I will be able to prosway the tutors to work on some EL materials. Plus having the basics being taken care of by the tutors, I can force on the academics.

NACD Update for Little Z- Second Quarter in the Program

Well I can’t believe its taken me this long to write about our March evaluation! Yikes!

The NACD is an organization that will help parents create a program plan to implement with their children to help them be the best they can be. These programs can be for children with disabilities, who are gifted, who are average, as well these programs can even be created for adults.

If you have read about what we were doing with Little Z before, you can check out our First Quarter NACD Programs Here.

Before the actually evaluation I had to do a reading test on Little Z, nothing fancy. So I gave them the test back an our evaluator marked it. Little Z’s reading recognition is at a Grade 2.8 level. Now we can’t test reading comprehension just yet, but this was pretty exciting for us.

Zakari:
– Continue the Listening Program
– Continue Targeted Sound Intervention
– Continue Encyclopedia Program
– Start Memory 4 U app x2

– Read books x2: For this program I have been using a mix of Farfaria, as well as regular picture books. 

– Continue Language Play: I don’t know why this program is difficult for me. If you ask my childhood friends, they will tell you I was queen of make believe play. But in my “old age” I guess I’m having trouble going back to that state of mind. 

– Start Experience books (Using Picello): This program I am creating books using pictures to tell a story. Right now we are working on a book about going to visit a family friend. 

– Language Related Photo flashcards (Using Picello)x3: This program we are teaching Little Z what to say for different situations. For example I have a photo of him in a high chair, so we would prompt him to say “I am hungry.”

– Functional Directions x20: Basically I have to give Z 20 directions, “put this in the laundry basket, could you put this in the sink, go to the bathroom for bathtime, etc”.


– COntinue Spontaneous Scripts x20. I talked about this before, but using a whiteboard I’m suppose to write things that Little Z might think. 


– 1 step directions x10: This is a bit different than Functional Directions. Here I have to ask him to do things that are not really functional, but still useful. Like point to the horse in the picture. Or touch your nose. Etc.

– Stairs x5: We are back to working on climbing stairs. This is to help build the muscles in his thighs.


– Mouth Stimulation x4: And we are still using one of those Nuby Rubbery ToothBrushes. This is to help desensitize his need to put things in his mouth. It really does seem to be helping. 


 We have had to make a super hard decision, and on the first of May I gave our 30 days notice to go into vacation mode with the NACD. RIght now we are working so closely with the herbalist/energy work, that money wise I cannot swing running both programs. Don’t you wish there was an endless supply of money to help your kids out. Sadly I have to make sure my kids are health physically, otherwise I am basically wasting money in the other areas.

But stay tuned because I finally have gotten out of my little funk I was in and have created a schedule for Z that combined what we learned with the NACD, plus sneaking in some other programs I feel are important.

Hot Housing Toddlers to Read?? Little Miss: a father, a daughter and rocket science (Book Review & Giveaway)

Toddlers that can read…

That statements holds a lot of stigma.

If you have taught your toddler to read, you must have pressured them with hours and hours of lessons and drills. Right?

Wrong!!

Nathan Meikle shared the journey of how his daughter learned how to read at the age of two in his book Little Miss: a father, his daughter & rocket science.

This book shares day by day accounts of not only how he got his child interested in learning how to read, and how he taught her. But also all the conversations about he had with his wife through the process, as well as his own doubts.

Overall I thought this was a very well written book. I couldn’t put it down and read it in a day. Even though it didn’t add to what I personally knew on teaching young children to read, (I only say this because I’m 7 or 8 years into this life style of parentings, first with Wes and then Little Z) I couldn’t help but think…

Imagine! This book on the book shelves at the local bookstore in the parenting section. A mother to be comes in looking for a book on how to parent her baby, what to expect the first year, etc. She stumbles upon it and reads the back, “Interesting…” she thinks and adds it to the pile to buy.

What I’m saying is I believe this book could be the gateway to early education. Parents read it and then start researching. Next thing you know they are on the BrillKids site, reading about Glenn Doman, Your Baby Can Read, etc. What an amazing gift these parents will be offering their children!

Ok! Ok Monique. So this little girl could read when she was 2. What good is that if she is just going to burn out? Well I’m happy to say she hasn’t burned out. She loves to read. Kyla is 5 though she hasn’t started kindergarten. She still LOVES to read, as long as her parents find the right books for her. Nathan told me that just a few days ago she picked out two different 60 page book and read them to herself. The other day she also typed out one of her favorite picture books–took her about 2 hours. He is guessing she’s at a 4th grade reading level. She even corrects him when they are reading together and his skips a word or mispronounces something.

They are also doing the same thing they did with their 2.5 year old son Bennett, only difference is they started a bit earlier than they did with Kyla.

It has been much harder with him because Kyla gets bored while listening to us try to teach Bennett to read. She often helps, we try to include her as much as we can, but inevitably, she is not happy when the YBCR DVD’s are on because she wants to watch something else. Bennett has always been a little behind where Kyla was in terms of language progressions, but he has memorized a handful of words from YBCR and knows all his letters and the sounds (he’s 2.5). There plan is to do memorization for another few months and then get started on phonics. Though the process is going slower with Bennett, the bright side is that both Kyla and Bennett are learning patience (hopefully) because at every mealtime we alternate books (e.g., Kyla chooses one, and then Bennett chooses one). In sum, the process is much easier with just one child, but it is also fun (though challenging) to teach Bennett to read as a family. Kyla will hopefully remember the days of teaching her little brother to read.

So now the fun part!! I have 2 copies of this book to giveaway. If you would like to win a copy check out the Rafflecopter below.

a Rafflecopter giveaway

This review is my honest opinion. I received a copy of the book to read and review, but otherwise was not compensated.

 

10 Steps/Tip to Jump Start Your Child’s Early Education.

So you want to teach your child to read, count, etc. Here are 10 tips to help you on your way.

1) Read Glenn Doman’s books “How To Teach Your Baby to Read” and “How to Multiply Your Baby’s Intelligence.”

Glenn Doman has several books out there and feel free to read all of them. However I found they could be very repetitive. So if you’re a busy parent who doesn’t have too much extra time, I feel you will get the most bang for your buck with these two.

How to Teach Your Baby To Read, will give you different steps on how to teach your little one to read. Reading is the most important program to work on in my opinion, because if a child can read, the can teach themselves where else they want to learn.

2) Join the BrillKids forum.

Sometimes it can be lonely when you’re trying to teach your young child and the people around you are not very supportive. You start hearing things like, “Let them just be a kid!” “Stop pressuring them…” Then you start to doubt yourself. Visit my post for the 4 Reasons WHY You Should Teach Your Baby To Read, then go join the BrillKids forum and start connecting with like minded parents.

3) Read Little Miss: a father, his daughter & rocket science. Nathan Meikle, has documented his journey teaching his daughter how to read. It is awesome to read a first hand account of what they did and how his daughter reacted.

4) Don’t try and do everything at once. Pick one or two things you want to teach your child and start working on them. Remember 10-15mins a day is better than not doing it at all.

Start with one program and do it at a set time. I find mealtimes are a good time for lessons. Especially Breakfast and Lunch. Also bedtime is another good time to sneak in a lesson.

As tempting as it is to start all sorts of great program at once, contain yourself! You will burn out and your child with feel bombarded. Start by adding things one or two at a time. Allow your child to get use to them and allow them to become part of your routine before you add another thing. This way you can watch to see how your child reacts to that one program to make sure its the right one for your child.

read for 20 mins a day

This chart keeps reminding me why reading to my children is so important.

5) Children learn to be readers in the laps of their parents. Spend a few mins a day reading with your child.

Look up reading list online and put a bunch of books on hold at your local library. Hit up the local thrift store and garage sales to find affordable new books for your child and you to read together.

Make sure you are not just teaching them how to read words, but spending time enjoying books together. If your child learns that reading is a fun thing to do, they will want you to teach them how to read.

You can also find fun age appropriate books on topics you might be working on. Like counting, shapes, manners, etc.

6) Utilize smartphone apps and/or tablets.

Now while I don’t think that tablets will replace books anytime soon, using apps to help teach a concept is super motivating for most children and super easy for a parent to use. Check out my post: Teaching My Toddler: What Apps Are We Using.

7)Youtube is full of good quality materials. Plus its FREE.

8) Utilize otherwise wasted time during the day to learn.

Educational songs in the car.

Read in the car while waiting for daycare to open.

So a quick 1 min round of flashcards at diaper changes, in and out of the carseat, etc…

Counting how many cheerios on their plate.

9) Start early

It is never too early to read to your baby, sing them the ABC songs, and talk to them about everything. Check out my post: Can I Teach My Newborn, Infant or Toddler Basic Kindergarten Skills? YES YOU CAN!

10) Avoid spending too much time planning. Spend that time with your child learning.

Its easy to get caught up researching, preparing and creating beautiful materials for your child to learn with. But if that is going to eat up your time, or you never finish it, or your child uses it for a day or two and masters it, is that time really well spent? Your child doesn’t care if the edges are cut perfect on your flashcards, or if they are on the back of old cereal boxes, special pretty paper. So don’t waste time or money on that.

 

What tips do you think are helpful that I may have missed?

FarFaria Review and GIVEAWAY

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farfaria1

Farfaria2FarFaria is a subscription based library for children 2-9 years old on your tablet or smartphone. It currently includes over 800 titles, with more being added weekly. It is subscription

If you have little bookworm at home, and don’t want to keep making daily trips to the library, this is the app for you. For just $4.99 a month, or $39.99 for the year.

I also found this app has intrigued my reluctant reader . My oldest is more of a math guy then a reader. However he is required to do home reading every night. Now that we have been using FarFaria, its just a matter of me asking him once to do his home reading. Before it would take me a while to get him to sit down and read.

I also find it has brought us together as a family to read together. I’ll sit down with Little Z, and we start reading, then the next thing you know the big kids are sitting with us. If we happen to be reading about something non-fiction, dad will even come a sit down too.

FarFaria FamilyChoiceYour child starts off by choosing a island to visit.

Once you are on that island, a bookshelf of books appears based on what you selected. Each have a letter on the lower right corner indicating the reading level that book falls into.

What if your child is interested in a book, but the level indicates it is too difficult for them? Simple! Just select the Auto Play or Read to Me button and the book becomes an book and an audio book in one. Some of the books even highlight the words as they are read. I wish every book did this as it would be an awesome thing for little ones learning to read using the Glenn Doman inspired method.

Now for the best part! The wonderful people at FarFaria have given me two 3 month subscriptions to giveaway to some lucky readers!!

 

DISCLAIMER: I was given a subscription to try with my family in exchange for an honest review.

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Not sure where I stand…

Well its now the middle February…
My son has been in school for a just over a month now.
He’s still loving it. His teacher is sweet as can be. The school seems to be on top of things. But…
I still don’t feel good about it.
I feel like I’m counting down the days to Spring Break and Summer.
I feel like even though I”m an active part of his education, I’m still in the dark.
I also feel helpless because his father, step-father, therapist, etc, all feel this is best for him.
But it doesn’t feel right.
I believe his education is suffering. I’m not sure this is the socialization I want him exposed to.
I feel so locked into a corner.
For now I’m slowly building his afterschooling program, and planning out some catch up time during his Spring Break and Summer Holiday. I’m looking at starting to teach him grammar and cursive handwriting this summer, both of which are not taught in grade 2. And supplementing his Science, Language Arts, and Social Studies with Classical Education at home. Also we will continue to work on Math using TouchMath,
I’m hoping this summer we can spend a lot of time hiking, exploring and enjoying the great outdoors.
~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*
On my goals list this week I managed to read two books, donate another 11 bags of stuff, and made a few more infant stimulation cards. So far I have managed to donate 42 bags of stuff, so I upped my goal to 60 bags before the baby comes.

This week I’m hoping to get my shelf built in my bedroom, organize my homeschooling and scrapbooking stuff. I’m also hoping to read another 2 books on my list.

Since I finished reading The Well Trained Mind(well I read the info that related the grammar stage and skipped over the middle school and high school stuff), I’m really excited to get started with Wesley. I went to the library and paid off my fines so we can start to use the books there again. As much as I like to buy books for our use, I don’t think it will be economical since I will not being working in a few months.

I’m very excited that next month I’ll be going for a girls scrapbooking weekend! I know it will be unlikely that I can go in the fall, so I decided to take advantage of it now.

As for the homeschooling conference. I’m still sitting on the fence. I want to attend, however its an extra expense and to be honest, I think it would be more upsetting to sit there and listen to people talk about the benefits of homeschooling when that’s not something I can do right now.

I’m hoping to write about our Soft Mozart experience. I had computer issue this weekend, so thats why I’m delayed.

MACHS Homeschool Conference 2011- Keynote Speaker Andrew Pudewa

Homeschool Conference 2011

What an amazing experience! This weekend I was able to attend our local Christian homeschooling group, MACHS, homeschooling conference. It was held for two days at Calvary Temple in Winnipeg.

I have to say this conference was AMAZING. Much to my excitement the keynote speaker was Andrew Pudewa, the director of the Institute for Excellence in Writing. While this was very impression, what really got our attending was the fact he was trained under both Suzuki and Doman. He actually worked with my hero Glenn Doman(author of the book “What To Do About Your Brain-injured Child“) at The Institutes for the Achievement of Human Potential.

Another early learning mom, who happens to be a good friend of mine, and I had the opportunity to talk to him after lunch.

Ok ok… We may have formed an attack to corner the poor man to try and pick his brains. He was busy looking for his missing cufflink, so we took this opportunity that he was in one area to speak with him.  As brief as it was, he was able to tell us about some interesting things.

– According to him, the IAHP is not open to new research. They have the mentality, if they didn’t come up with it they are not interested in it. After hearing this, I also heard something similar from somewhere else. This is really sad to hear and I hope it is not true because there is still so much to learn about the human brain. By limiting their interest in other studies they will eventually become dated.

– We talked about EK flashcards. He went on to tell us how the connections are made. Basically if you never saw anything you wouldn’t think about anything. By showing EK bits you are providing your child the chance to think about something, there for making connections in the brain.

– He also told us about another person that he use to work with at the IAHP that left the institute and opened his own clinic the Family Hope Center. I’m under the impression the founder of the Family Hope Center was fed up the IAHP would not consider new research on Brain Injured children. Another thing that seemed to bother them was the fact that the people who are now in charge of the IAHP are Scientology and as a devout Christian he did not agree with the way it was run. So I spent some time on their website and decided to place a call. They were already closed for the day so I left a message. I’m interested to see what this place is about.

We then spent time listening to the keynote speaker sessions, wondered around the 3 exhibit halls and ate lunch. I managed to control my spending habits. I bought Wesley a new bow for his birthday, 2 workbooks and and parents guide. I loved there was so much about Suzuki music this time around. I’m not sure if they will be able to beat it next year.

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